Here are some tips to help you find work as an English Teacher in Granada
When

In Spain most students need to get a certificate. There are English exams nearly every month and a huge demand for exam classes. This means teaching jobs available all throughout the year.

If you’re interested in getting a decent contract and some stability, it’s always a good idea to plan strategically and start working at the beginning of the academic year. This way, you are more likely to teach not only exam preparation classes but also General English, different levels and ages.

January and February are also good months for exam classes: If you’ve started to work in a school in September, your hours will pick up. If you haven’t, you won’t have a problem getting work but you might find it hard to negotiate a reasonably good timetable.

Tip – Find a good school and apply for a job at the end of June to be considered for September. Many language schools will hire you to do some of the summer intensive courses as a trial period. If they’re happy with you, you will be offered the opportunity to continue in September.

Remember – In most language schools, interviews and course arrangements take place in September and October. Even if you’ve sent your CV and cover letter by July, you might not be contacted until September.

How

Granada is a fairly small city and contacts work very well. Don’t worry if you don’t live here or have any friends to help yet though! Language schools are constantly recruiting teachers, so they’ll be interested in hearing from you.

Tip – Word of mouth is the most efficient marketing strategy: ask expats and acquaintances around if their school is looking for teachers.

Tip – I know it works but I’ve never got a job in Granada through contacts. I never wait for job posts and I don’t physically go round trying to find work either.

This is how I do it:

  1. I collect a list of email addresses of all language schools / academies on the Internet
  2. I write a professional, direct and well written email as a cover letter
  3. I proofread my CV (and email!) several times, and I attach it to the email
  4. I copy all the contacts in the bcc section. Make sure you do this: when recruiters see you’ve sent the same email to 25 schools, they don’t feel very special
  5. I click on send and wait for replies
  6. Reply immediately: thank and arrange an interview
  7. I spend a couple of weeks doing interviews and then decide which school I prefer.
What

Choosing the right place to work at is always a bit of a gamble but there are ways to avoid unnecessary risks.

Tip – Reputation is important: Find some information about the school online. There’s also a TEFL blacklist online I always check!

Tip – I tend to favour schools that ask me to do a demo lesson: it’s the best way to check whether employers are truly interested in language learning and quality. Besides, it’s the best way to demonstrate your qualities as a teacher.

Tip – A legal contract, a decent salary and a fair amount of hours per month is essential. Unfortunately, many teaching jobs won’t recognise all your actual hours on contract, and in most schools you’ll get paid cash in hand for some classes.

Tip – A language school with professional development opportunities and academic guidance coming from Teacher Trainers, the Director of Studies or Senior Teachers makes an excellent choice if you want to enhance your teaching skills.

Do you have any more ideas? Any tips to help finding a good job here?
Teach English in Spain

Teach English in Spain

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